Programme Our programme for the 2017/2018 membership year (September 17 to October 18) The is no charge at the Car Park in December so long as you arrive after 6pm. 22 November 2017 Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera: The Golden Age of Mexican Paintings Chloe Sayer BA (Hons.) Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) and Diego Rivera (1886-1957) have iconic status in Mexico. Rivera's intricate visual narratives, rich with allegory and symbolism, adorn the walls of public buildings. Inspired by Aztec and Maya imagery, and by early Italian fresco painting, his vast murals combine social criticism with faith in human progress. Kahlo's work, unlike Rivera's, is small in format. Arguably Mexico’s most original painter, she made herself the principal theme of her art. Her paintings reflect her experiences and dreams. This lecture surveys the work of both artists; it chronicles their turbulent marriage and Mexico's history after the 1910 Revolution. Nude with Calla Lilies (Rivera)                                                                                      Self Portrait (Kahlo) Background on Rivera Background on Kahlo 24 January 2018 The Hitler Emigres: Their Impact on British Artistic and Cultural Life Daniel Snowman What do these have in common: The Penguin Pool at London Zoo; the Glyndebourne and Edinburgh Festivals; the publishers Phaidon and Thames & Hudson; Pevsner's Buildings of England; "The Red Shoes" and the Amadeus Quartet? Each was created by émigrés from Central Europe who found refuge in Britain. Artists, architects, film makers, musicians, publishers, historians, psychologists and scientists: all brought something of their continental legacy to Britain. Their collective talent was enormous and their influence far in excess of their numbers. Review from the Guardian on Danel Snowman’s book on Hitler Emigres 28 February2018 Shaken by an Earthquake: Igor Stravinsky, the Ballet Russes and the Astonishing 1913 Premier of the Rite of Spring Sandy Burnett The story of one of the greatest creative collaborations of all:  Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, whose team of dancers, choreographers, and costume and set designers transformed expectations of what a night in the theatre could be, and the circumstances behind its most notorious stage work of all. Sandy examines the build-up to the Rite of Spring’s première in Paris, takes a look at the original costumes, plays excerpts from this fascinatingly inventive score, and explores what divided opinions of that first- night audience quite so dramatically.  No, nothing could top the riot at the Rite in 1913… Telegraph article on the Rite of Spring 28 March 2018 Cultural Anxieties and Ritual Protection in High Status Early Modern Houses James Wright FSA The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were marked by a radical increase in the numbers of accusations of witchcraft throughout Europe. Evil incarnate was a very real fear for the populace and this led to a raft of folk-traditions being employed to protect house and home from possession. Using the case studies of the Tower of London and Knole, Kent this lecture presents and explains how the houses of the rich were given spiritual protection from demonic forces. Symbols found at Knole Norwich Castle protection spells The rituals of house protection 25 April 2018 Wanderings among the Nomadic Tribes of Iran and Afghanistan:  Searching for the Woven Art and Symbolism of the Nomads Brian MacDonald FRGS My time spent in Iran and Afghanistan during the 1970s, began to foster a passion for the wonderful woven art produced by nomads on basic ground looms. My subsequent visits were spent travelling and searching amongst nomadic tribes for these exquisite 19th century weavings, which have become harder to find and have now virtually disappeared amongst the tribes themselves. This lecture illustrates the woven art of the nomads as they moved over the lands they have travelled for generations. We will have the opportunity of seeing their way of life and looking at the 19th century rugs and utilitarian weavings, similar to those which I discovered during my forays into the different tribal territories. During the Soviet war in Afghanistan, some tribal weavers began to weave the devastation and violence they saw into their carpets. The popularity of these soon spread, and it gained recognition as a form of Afghan folk art. In this war rug, Mujahideen combat a devil representing the USSR.  Background to the history of carpets from the region Reviving the carpet weaving skills Persian rugs   23 May 2018 Treasures and Curiosities of the Royal Library at Windsor Castle Oliver Everett The Library is primarily used by the Queen to show to her guests after dinner parties at Windsor Castle. This is because it is so full of a great range of fascinating objects associated with the history of Britain and the Royal family. The lecture gives a tour of the Library similar to that experienced by the Queen's guests. The Library is open to academic researchers but not to the general public. The lecture therefore constitutes a rare opportunity to see its rooms and treasures. These treasures include beautiful and rare books and manuscripts; books with personal royal associations; old master drawings (Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Holbein, Canaletto) and watercolours; jewellery; insignia of Orders of Chivalry; miniature paintings; clocks; fans; maps; the shirt in which Charles I was executed; and the Queen's description (when Princess Elizabeth, aged 11) of her father's Coronation in 1937. Royal Collection web site 27 June 2018 The Silver Thread: Silver Filigree and Traditional Art in Kosovo Elizabeth Gowing MA From the early Kosovan silver mines which are mentioned in Dante, through the twentieth century politics over Kosovo’s mines which resulted in both a war and a golf course, a silver thread winds through Kosovo’s history. Its most intricate tanglings are in the country’s cultural capital, Prizren, where a seventh generation of filigree artisans use ‘filum’ and ‘granum’, zigzags, ‘mouse-tooth’ designs and other twists and turns to magic lacy creations from dull sticks of raw material. The results – in boxes, buttons, jewellery, religious ornamentation and the talismans of superstitition – are a fine narrative of Kosovo’s history and traditions. Background to Filigree in Kosovo with videos The art of Filigree US Council article There are no lectures in July & August 25 July 2018: Social evening - separate booking and payment required.  Further details later. The Fascinating World of Playing Cards Yasha Beresiner LL.B Surprisingly today’s playing cards date back to  1377. Decks from 1475 still survive. The English deck is of French origin and the Company of Makers of Playing Cards was founded in 1628 to protect English makers from French importations. Cards were used as a medium of communication, propaganda or education: the 1678 Titus Oates plot is illustrated on a 52 card deck published at the time and known as The Horrid Popish Plot. Francis Barlow illustrated the cards depicting Marlborough's Victories in 1707. Modern cards follow in these old traditions with some wonderful collectors’ decks of today. Click here for Yasha’s own web site History of playing cards 26 September 2018 Burlington House and the History of the Royal Academy of Arts Stephen Richardson MA Burlington House on London’s Piccadilly has been the home of the Royal Academy of Arts since 1868. Although the Academy was already 100 years old when it took up residence, it is not commonly known that the building has a long and fascinating history of its own. This talk focuses on the origins of Burlington House, from construction in the 1660’s for a courtier to King Charles II; re-fashioning as a Palladian mansion for Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington; its association with architects and artists such as William Kent and Sebastiano Ricci; further re-development by the Cavendish family during the Regency period, and its ultimate role as the home of the United Kingdom's leading 'society for promoting the Arts of Design'. The talk also examines the reasons behind the founding of the Royal Academy, its own early history and its Olympian era during the time of eminent Victorian artists such as Leighton, Millais and Frith. Burlington House web site The history of Burlington House This is the last lecture in the 2017/18 membership year.
Web site  and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training
The Arts Society Leicester
Our programme for the 2017/2018 membership year (September 17 to October 18)  22 November 2017 Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera: The Golden Age of Mexican Paintings Chloe Sayer BA (Hons.)   Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) and Diego Rivera (1886-1957) have iconic status in Mexico. Rivera's intricate visual narratives, rich with allegory and symbolism, adorn the walls of public buildings. Inspired by Aztec and Maya imagery, and by early Italian fresco painting, his vast murals combine social criticism with faith in human progress. Kahlo's work, unlike Rivera's, is small in format. Arguably Mexico’s most original painter, she made herself the principal theme of her art. Her paintings reflect her experiences and dreams. This lecture surveys the work of both artists; it chronicles their turbulent marriage and Mexico's history after the 1910 Revolution.  Nude with Calla Lilies (Rivera)                                                                                      Self Portrait (Kahlo)      There is no meeting in December  24 January 2018 The Hitler Emigres: Their Impact on British Artistic and Cultural Life Daniel Snowman   What do these have in common: The Penguin Pool at London Zoo; the Glyndebourne and Edinburgh Festivals; the publishers Phaidon and Thames & Hudson; Pevsner's Buildings of England; "The Red Shoes" and the Amadeus Quartet? Each was created by émigrés from Central Europe who found refuge in Britain. Artists, architects, film makers, musicians, publishers, historians, psychologists and scientists: all brought something of their continental legacy to Britain. Their collective talent was enormous and their influence far in excess of their numbers.   Review from the Guardian on Danel Snowman’s book on Hitler Emigres  28 February2018 Shaken by an Earthquake: Igor Stravinsky, the Ballet Russes and the Astonishing 1913 Premier of the Rite of Spring Sandy Burnett   The story of one of the greatest creative collaborations of all:  Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, whose team of dancers, choreographers, and costume and set designers transformed expectations of what a night in the theatre could be, and the circumstances behind its most notorious stage work of all. Sandy examines the build-up to the Rite of Spring’s première in Paris, takes a look at the original costumes, plays excerpts from this fascinatingly inventive score, and explores what divided opinions of that first-night audience quite so dramatically.  No, nothing could top the riot at the Rite in 1913…   28 March 2018 Cultural Anxieties and Ritual Protection in High Status Early Modern Houses James Wright FSA   The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were marked by a radical increase in the numbers of accusations of witchcraft throughout Europe. Evil incarnate was a very real fear for the populace and this led to a raft of folk-traditions being employed to protect house and home from possession. Using the case studies of the Tower of London and Knole, Kent this lecture presents and explains how the houses of the rich were given spiritual protection from demonic forces.   25 April 2018 Wanderings among the Nomadic Tribes of Iran and Afghanistan: Searching for the Woven Art and Symbolism of the Nomads Brian MacDonald FRGS   My time spent in Iran and Afghanistan during the 1970s, began to foster a passion for the wonderful woven art produced by nomads on basic ground looms. My subsequent visits were spent travelling and searching amongst nomadic tribes for these exquisite 19th century weavings, which have become harder to find and have now virtually disappeared amongst the tribes themselves.  This lecture illustrates the woven art of the nomads as they moved over the lands they have travelled for generations. We will have the opportunity of seeing their way of life and looking at the 19th century rugs and utilitarian weavings, similar to those which I discovered during my forays into the different tribal territories.  Above: During the Soviet war in Afghanistan, some tribal weavers began to weave the devastation and violence they saw into their carpets. The popularity of these soon spread, and it gained recognition as a form of Afghan folk art. In this war rug, Mujahideen combat a devil representing the USSR.      23 May 2018 Treasures and Curiosities of the Royal Library at Windsor Castle Oliver Everett   The Library is primarily used by the Queen to show to her guests after dinner parties at Windsor Castle. This is because it is so full of a great range of fascinating objects associated with the history of Britain and the Royal family. The lecture gives a tour of the Library similar to that experienced by the Queen's guests. The Library is open to academic researchers but not to the general public. The lecture therefore constitutes a rare opportunity to see its rooms and treasures. These treasures include beautiful and rare books and manuscripts; books with personal royal associations; old master drawings (Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Holbein, Canaletto) and watercolours; jewellery; insignia of Orders of Chivalry; miniature paintings; clocks; fans; maps; the shirt in which Charles I was executed; and the Queen's description (when Princess Elizabeth, aged 11) of her father's Coronation in 1937.    27 June 2018 The Silver Thread: Silver Filigree and Traditional Art in Kosovo Elizabeth Gowing MA   From the early Kosovan silver mines which are mentioned in Dante, through the twentieth century politics over Kosovo’s mines which resulted in both a war and a golf course, a silver thread winds through Kosovo’s history. Its most intricate tanglings are in the country’s cultural capital, Prizren, where a seventh generation of filigree artisans use ‘filum’ and ‘granum’, zigzags, ‘mouse-tooth’ designs and other twists and turns to magic lacy creations from dull sticks of raw material. The results – in boxes, buttons, jewellery, religious ornamentation and the talismans of superstitition – are a fine narrative of Kosovo’s history and traditions.  There are no lectures in July & August  25 July 2018: Social evening - separate booking and payment required.  Further details later. The Fascinating World of Playing Cards Yasha Beresiner LL.B   Surprisingly today’s playing cards date back to 1377. Decks from 1475 still survive. The English deck is of French origin and the Company of Makers of Playing Cards was founded in 1628 to protect English makers from French importations. Cards were used as a medium of communication, propaganda or education: the 1678 Titus Oates plot is illustrated on a 52 card deck published at the time and known as The Horrid Popish Plot. Francis Barlow illustrated the cards depicting Marlborough's Victories in 1707. Modern cards follow in these old traditions with some wonderful collectors’ decks of today.    26 September 2018 Burlington House and the History of the Royal Academy of Arts Stephen Richardson MA   Burlington House on London’s Piccadilly has been the home of the Royal Academy of Arts since 1868. Although the Academy was already 100 years old when it took up residence, it is not commonly known that the building has a long and fascinating history of its own. This talk focuses on the origins of Burlington House, from construction in the 1660’s for a courtier to King Charles II; re-fashioning as a Palladian mansion for Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington; its association with architects and artists such as William Kent and Sebastiano Ricci; further re-development by the Cavendish family during the Regency period, and its ultimate role as the home of the United Kingdom's leading 'society for promoting the Arts of Design'.  The talk also examines the reasons behind the founding of the Royal Academy, its own early history and its Olympian era during the time of eminent Victorian artists such as Leighton, Millais and Frith.
Web site and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training